Blast from the Past

BY: Kieran Grant
SCHOOL: Holy Trinity Catholic Secondary School, Courtice, Ontario
GRADE: 9
Did you know that just 200 years ago the stethoscope was a rolled up piece of paper? The technology in medicine has been evolving at an astounding rate. From 1800-1865, the mortality rate of surgery patients dropped from 47% to 18%! That means that the survival rate skyrocketed from just 53% in 1800 to 82% in 1865. Medical tools also improved drastically. In the early 1800’s there was no such thing as anaesthetic. Patients who needed amputations were just held down while they were amputated. Now the patient is completely unconscious and experiences no pain during the amputation.
Many other innovations have also been made in the fields of medicine and health care in the last couple of centuries. To see the evolution, you could just look at the history of nursing. In the early 19th century, nurses tended to have no training and no experience. They were treated like maids who just tidied beds and cleaned up. Now, nurses are highly trained medical professionals trained to cope with stress, calm and reassure patients, make the hospital friendly and prepare for the unexpected.
Another major advancement in health care is the doctors themselves. They used to be laid back, had poor attitudes, used primitive technology, guessed causes and effects of diseases, and were not always respected. Today however, doctors are highly trained individuals, are highly respected, use latest developing technology to cure illnesses and devote most of their lives to helping other people.
Many more advancements have been made since the 19th century, but to see all of them for yourself, you’ll have to visit the Kingston Museum of Health Care at King Street and George Street. Come down and see what medical wonders you will discover!

BY: Kieran Grant
SCHOOL: Holy Trinity Catholic Secondary School, Courtice, Ontario
GRADE: 9
Did you know that just 200 years ago the stethoscope was a rolled up piece of paper? The technology in medicine has been evolving at an astounding rate. From 1800-1865, the mortality rate of surgery patients dropped from 47% to 18%! That means that the survival rate skyrocketed from just 53% in 1800 to 82% in 1865. Medical tools also improved drastically. In the early 1800’s there was no such thing as anaesthetic. Patients who needed amputations were just held down while they were amputated. Now the patient is completely unconscious and experiences no pain during the amputation.
Many other innovations have also been made in the fields of medicine and health care in the last couple of centuries. To see the evolution, you could just look at the history of nursing. In the early 19th century, nurses tended to have no training and no experience. They were treated like maids who just tidied beds and cleaned up. Now, nurses are highly trained medical professionals trained to cope with stress, calm and reassure patients, make the hospital friendly and prepare for the unexpected.
Another major advancement in health care is the doctors themselves. They used to be laid back, had poor attitudes, used primitive technology, guessed causes and effects of diseases, and were not always respected. Today however, doctors are highly trained individuals, are highly respected, use latest developing technology to cure illnesses and devote most of their lives to helping other people.
Many more advancements have been made since the 19th century, but to see all of them for yourself, you’ll have to visit the Kingston Museum of Health Care at King Street and George Street. Come down and see what medical wonders you will discover!

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